Breadcrumbs navigation

Jerusalem (Jubilee) Synagogue (Jeruzalémská synagoga (Jubilejní)

The newest and largest synagogue of the Jewish community in Prague is an interesting example of Art Nouveau melded with Moorish style. Its interior is richly painted in Art Nouveau style.

Jerusalem (Jubilee) Synagogue (Jeruzalémská synagoga (Jubilejní), Jeruzalémská 7, Praha 1 - Nové Město, 110 00
Web: http://www.synagogue.cz, http://www.kehilaprag.cz, e-mail: sekretariat@kehilaprag.cz
tel.: +420224800812, +420224800813
Follow us on Facebook

Opening hours

April – October

Monday
11.00 – 17.00
Tuesday
11.00 – 17.00
Wednesday
11.00 – 17.00
Thursday
11.00 – 17.00
Friday
11.00 – 17.00
Sunday
11.00 – 17.00

Show more info

  • closed: Saturdays and Jewish holidays

Entrance fee

basic

80 CZK

reduced

50 CZK

SERVICES - times on www.kehilaprag.cz

ADMISSION FEES in detail here

Show more info

Object history

The youngest and at the same time the largest synagogue construction of the Prague Jewish Community, the synagogue in a Pseudo-Moorish style, was initiated on the 26th June 1905, and completed on the 1st September 1906, based on the plans of a Vienna architect and experienced synagogue builder Wilhelm Stiassny, the builder being Alois Richter. The interior decoration, colourful decoration of the aisle, the wall paintings and stuccos were provided for by František Fröhlich’s enterprise. The front face of the building is characteristic for its mighty arch and a big rose-window, where the hexagram of David’s star is located. The synagogue was built as a compensation for church buildings demolished due to sanitation. The centre of the Western front face is decorated by a Czech and Hebrew inscription: This is God’s gate, through which the righteous enter. Don’t we all have but one father? Have we not been created by the only God? There are two towers on both sides of the entrance. There are 850 seats in the synagogue, the side galleries being designed for women, with separate entrances. The inside face with the church veil is decorated with a grape-vine motive. Above the vine, there are Moses’ desks with Ten Commandments.

The name Jubilee was suggested by the Israelite society to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Franz Joseph I. This society also purchased the house on which the synagogue is placed. In 1907, the synagogue passed from the Synagogue society into the property of the Prague Jewish Community. The church service has been delivered here continuously, with the exception of the period of protectorate. It was festively re-opened to public in 1996 after the first larger reconstruction during the 90s. Richly painted ornaments of a Vienna Art Nouveau style were discovered on approximately twenty five square meters under the deposits of plaster and layers of old painting.

 

Show history