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Lobkowicz Palace

Lobkowicz Palace was built on the site where there had been vineyards and gardens once. Around 1704 a new palace-type building was built by him here according to the project by the high Baroque architect, Giovanni Battista Alliprandi. Until 1927, the palace was the headquarters of the Mělník branch of the Lobkowicz family. In 1931 the Czechoslovak state bought the palace for the Ministry of Education and it has served as the embassy building since 1945. Today the embassy of Germany is located in the building.

Lobkowicz Palace, Vlašská 19, Praha 1 - Malá Strana, 118 01
Web: http://www.prag.diplo.de/

Object history

Construction and decoration
Lobkowicz Palace was built on the site where there had been vineyards and gardens once. A part of the area was occupied by Strahov Abbey brewery, which was rebuilt by the new owner in 1616 to the U Tří mušketýrů (Three Musketeers) house. The house and surrounding gardens and vineyards, which were later subdivided into building plots, had been gradually purchased by František Karel Přehořovský z Kvasejovic, the highest mintmaster of the Bohemian kingdom.
Around 1704 a new palace-type building was built by him here according to the project by the high Baroque architect, Giovanni Battista Alliprandi. At that time the palace was named Přehořovských from the owner and the first builder. The construction of the palace was managed by its builder, Bartolomeo Scotti. Tommaso Soldati worked here as a plasterer and decorated the whole palace and sala terrena on the ground floor. Allegorical frescoes in the lobby, Triumph of peace over war over the main staircase and remarkable large-scale paintings in the halls of the ground floor were made around 1720 by Jan Jakub Steinfels. The palace is one of the most valuable buildings of the high Baroque. Originally, it was the ground floor building with three wings; later the half-storey was added above the ground floor. A massive column portal penetrates both the ground floor and half-storey and bears the balcony.
In 1753 Lobkowitz family acquired the palace; following the fire in 1768 the family restored it and added the second floor designed by Ignác Jan Palliardi to its wings.

Garden
The rugged garden forefront has a semi-circular layout with central cylindrical projection, the ground floor of which creates the of sala terrena with vividly decorated facade in the style of Viennese baroque. The large terraced garden of the Italian type on the northern slope of Petřín Hill was created by the gardener, Jan Jiří Kapula, at the time of palace construction. Later, after 1790 the garden was extended and converted into an English park by Antonin Skalník. At that time the first alpinum in Bohemia was established here. At the entrance from the courtyard to the garden sandstone group sculptures are placed at gate pillars; they are called Kidnapping of Proserpina and Kidnapping of Orechtheie and were created by an unknown sculptor of Viennese School in the first quarter of the 18th century.

Until 1927, the palace was the headquarters of the Mělník branch of the Lobkowicz family.
In 1931 the Czechoslovak state bought the palace for the Ministry of Education and it has served as the embassy building since 1945. Today the embassy of Germany is located in the building.

Show history