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Jewish Museum in Prague – Klausen Synagogue (Židovské muzeum – Klausová synagoga)

The Klausen Synagogue is located near the entrance to the Old Jewish Cemetery. The Baroque building was built on the site after a disastrous fire in 1689 and was completed in 1694. It is the largest synagogue of the Prague ghetto and is the second main synagogue of the Prague Jewish community. The synagogue features an exhibition of the Jewish Museum dedicated to Jewish traditions and customs.

Jewish Museum in Prague – Klausen Synagogue (Židovské muzeum – Klausová synagoga), U Starého hřbitova 1, Praha 1 - Josefov, 110 00
Web: http://www.jewishmuseum.cz, e-mail: office@jewishmuseum.cz
tel.: +420222749211

Opening hours

November – March

Monday
09.00 – 16.30
Tuesday
09.00 – 16.30
Wednesday
09.00 – 16.30
Thursday
09.00 – 16.30
Friday
09.00 – 16.30
Sunday
09.00 – 16.30

April – October

Monday
09.00 – 18.00
Tuesday
09.00 – 18.00
Wednesday
09.00 – 18.00
Thursday
09.00 – 18.00
Friday
09.00 – 18.00
Sunday
09.00 – 18.00

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Closed on Saturdays and Jewish holidays.

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TOURS:

 

Jewish Museum in Prague:

The Spanish, Pinkas and Klausen synagogues, The Ceremonial Hall, The Old Jewish Cemetery and Robert Guttmann Gallery:

  • full 300 CZK
  • reduced 200 CZK

 

Prague Jewish Town:

Jewish Museum in Prague and The Old-New Synagogue:

  • full 480 CZK
  • reduced 320 CZK

 

The Old-New Synagogue:

  • full 200 CZK
  • reduced 140 CZK

 

Robert Guttmann Gallery and The Spanish synagogue:

  • full 70 CZK
  • reduced 50 CZK

 

Robert Guttmann Gallery:

  • full 40 CZK
  • reduced 20 CZK

 

The ticket is valid for 7 days - this applies to individuals (max. 5 persons) and families – for one visit to each site.

Reduced admission fee: children 6-15, students upto 26 years of age.

Children upto 6 years of age free.

Admission fees in detail

 

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Programme

Object history

Klausen Synagogue – Jewish Museum

A building made up of three parts, seclusions (klaus = cell, from latin claustrum), was built on a land plot purchased by Mordechai Maisel, then the primate. The seclusions, cells, gave the synagogue its name. One part was founded by rabbi Löw for the talmud college, the second part was a chapel, and the third part was designed for a ritual spa (mikve) and for the care of the sick. In 1689 the entire object burnt down, and it was thanks to the superior Šalamoun Chališ Kohen that in 1694, a new synagogue, this time single, was built in an early-Baroque style, with single-aisle auditorium premises with richly pargetted wagon vault with lunettes. It was originally named New Klausen School. It was the largest synagogue in the ghetto, the second main synagogue of the Prague Jewish community, and the synagogue of the Prague burial society (institution taking care of Jewish burials and cemeteries, of the sick, the elderly, and the dying).

It was modified in 1882 - 3 by architect Bedřich Münzberger, and again after 1921. During occupation, the interior facilities were destroyed. The synagogue went through new reconstructions in 1979 - 84 and 1995 - 96. Only the window shapes were preserved from the original building, and an inscription plate on the pillar, dating the origin of the synagogue back to 1694. The Jewish museum has its fixed exposition here, named Jewish traditions and habits.

 

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